Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

Why do we need thiamine?
Thiamine is involved in metabolism of nutrients like lipid and carbohydrate metabolism as a coenzyme. It is important for the functioning of brain and nervous system.

What are the sources of thiamine?
Whole grain cereals, nuts, legumes, green leafy vegetables, lean cuts of pork, organ meats, liver and eggs are good sources of thiamine.

How much thiamine do you need?

Age/Life Stage Males(mg/d) Females(mg/d)

Children

 

1-3 years

0.5

0.5

4-6 years

0.7

0.7

7-9 years

0.8

0.8

Adolescents

10-12 years

1.1

1.0

13-15 years

1.4

1.2

16-17 years

1.5

1.0

Adult sedentary

1.2

1.0

Pregnancy

NA

1.2

Lactation

NA

1.3

(ICMR,2010)
Thiamine is a water soluble vitamin thus it dissolves in water and is not stored,which means we need a continuous supply of Thiamine in our diets.
Vitamin B1 deficiency causes disease known as dry or wet beriberi. Milder deficiency may result in muscle weakness, tingling and numbness in extremities.

Tips for serving a meal rich in vitamin B1:

  • Serve whole-grain cereals every day and do not wash before cooking or rinse after cooking
  • Roast meat at a moderate temperature and cook only until it is done – overcooking at a high temperature destroys thiamin
  • Water-soluble vitamins are easily destroyed or washed out during food storage or preparation. Proper storage and preparation of food can minimize their losses